Arthur Becker: Ups and Downs

From the outside, it seems like every entrepreneur has the same story. They all invest and build companies and brands that turn out incredibly successful. While most entrepreneurs have their share of failures and successes, upon a closer look, very few entrepreneurs have anything in common.

Arthur Becker’s story is completely different from anyone else’s. For starters, Becker follows his passions into whatever industry they lead him to explore. His business dealings spanned over finance, biotech, art, and real estate. He was even a senior adviser for the Vera Wang fashion company. Lately, it seems that he’s focused on real estate.

Early in his career, he worked as a stockbroker. Unsatisfied with his job, Arthur Becker launched a series of startups. He really became interested in early stage biotech companies. Much of his fortune was made from dealing with tech companies; especially NaviSite, a company Becker operated until its sell in 2011.

Now, Arthur Becker is involved in a real estate project involving three luxury townhouses at Sullivan Street. He owned one property on Sullivan Street, which he traded ownership of for ownership of three other Sullivan properties. He was originally developing 10 Sullivan Street, a 16-story condo building, with Maloney and Robert Gladstone’s Madison Equities.

According to The Real Deal, one of his first real estate projects involved a property at 465 Washington Street. He developed the eight-unit luxury condo and sold it for over $50 million. Today, his Tribeca office is near that same property. He also uses his office as an art studio to explore his creative side.

Over the years, Becker became more involved with art and expression. The early part of his life was filled with business ventures and trying to survive the corporate world. Now, the 66-year-old entrepreneur is finding a new meaning of life.

That’s not to say that he’s completely abandoning his business mindset. Much of his artwork involves money of some sort. Many of his sculptures are reproductions or representations of crumpled money. It’s his expression of the way society has placed too much on money.

See more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/11/vera-wang-arthur-becker-separate-_n_1664277.html

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